Microsoft increases onboarding message size limit to 150MB

In yesterday’s rollup article for December 2014, Microsoft mentioned that they have upped the 25MB message size limit to 150MB when onboarding a mailbox to Office 365. The new limit applies, for instance, to mailboxes moved through a hybrid configuration to Office 365:

Office 365 Exchange Online message size onboarding limit increase — We are making a change to allow customers to migrate larger mail messages to Exchange Online. We now allow messages up to 150MB to be migrated to the service. The change is available immediately to all customers and is published as a new limit in the Exchange Online limits page in the Office 365 service description. We are not changing other limits such as mailbox size or maximum send/receive limit for messages. This change enables customers with large messages to easily migrate their existing content to the message.

Before, any message greater than 25MB were skipped. The hard limit might have been a little over 25MB, because the system accounted for overhead as well. As a result of that, the administrator either had to manually export those message from the mailbox (to keep them) or just ‘leave them behind’.

According to Paul Cunningham (ExchangeServerPro.com) this change also applies to offboarding scenarios.

This new limit is without any doubt good news for many organizations that are moving (or looking to move) to Office 365. The change also adds something extra to consider when onboarding mailboxes –mainly with regards to the velocity of a migration. Before, mailboxes could potentially be a lot smaller if it contained many items that exceeded the limit. With the new limit, administrators will have to take into account the additional payload (size) of those messages; potentially increasing the amount of data that has to be moved to ‘the cloud’.

All in all, this is yet another obstacle that Microsoft got rid of in favor of moving to Office 365 easier, but there are still some ‘limitations’ left; I can’t wait for Microsoft to address those too! For instance, the message size limit for sending and receiving messages hasn’t changed and Free/Busy lookups between two hybrid organizations is still a pain as well. However, I have no doubt that Microsoft will tackle these issues in due time as well.

Blog Exchange News Office 365

2015, here we are!

We’re almost one day into the new year and this is usually the time people look back at the past year and make their comments. As I have my piece coming up on TechTarget shortly, I will save you from doing it here! However, I do want to look forward a bit and tell you about some of the (cool) things I’ve been working on (which is also why it’s been a little more quiet on my blog these past few weeks…).

First of all, starting my new job at ENow has kept me quite busy. There’s always a learning curve when starting at a new place and I certainly had to learn a lot (still have to). As a result, I haven’t had as much time for writing as I would have liked. On the other hand, I’m pretty sure that the “Configuring and Managing Exchange Server 2013 High Availability” ebook has had its hand at why I have not written as much as I usually try to do. Nonetheless, I have prepared some things which I hope to be releasing in the next few days and weeks. Here’s a little teaser:

1. I am working on a comparative analysis of several 3rd party identity federation solutions that work with Office 365 (such as e.g. Celestix and Orka). It is not my intention to determine which one is better than the other, instead I wanted to talk about what each service/manufacturer does and how it works with and relates to Office 365 (and maybe walk you through the basic configuration). Given that Identity Management is a big part of the work I do with Office 365, I found this might be useful! Next to the aforementioned vendors, I also hope to include solutions from Ping Identity and OneLogin so that I cover a little more ground. Unfortunately I cannot cover all solutions that exists, but if you think I should take a look at another solutions, feel free to shoot me an email! If time permits, the first part should be available before the end of this week.

2. 2014 was definitely a year in which “Cyber Security” has had a lot of attention… More specifically, there have been a lot of “breaches”, the last one being the story of how Sony got attacked and sensitive information got leaked –apparently via email. Together with some other MVPs, I will be building a set of articles to discuss how these events relate to Exchange and how you can “harden” your Exchange environment. Even though Exchange is considered (and it is) to be “secure out of the box”, there are some additional steps you could take –IF your organization requires it. However, if you decide to take additional steps, it’s even more important that you do things right. And that’s the sweet spot we’re aiming for.

Lastly, I’m happy to announce that 2015 start off quite well. Earlier today I was presented with the MVP-Award for the third time in a row. I would like to take this opportunity to thank you guys for supporting me by reading my articles and interacting through comments. I look forward to many more interesting talks in the coming year!

Michael

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Microsoft manages to ship yet another broken Cumulative Update…

A few days ago, Microsoft released Cumulative Update 6 for Exchange 2013 to the world. There used to be a time where Exchange server updates were fairly safe. However, pretty much like in every other Cumulative Update for Exchange 2013, this one also includes some bugs which break functionality in one way or another. While one would say that it starts to become painful for Microsoft, I’m starting to believe it’s more of a joke.

Exchange Server MVP Jeff Guillet was the one to first report the issue. As it turns out, the Hybrid Configuration Wizard in CU6 runs just fine, but some of the features (like initiating a mailbox move from the on-premises EAC or the ability to switch between the on-prem/cloud EAC) no longer work. Although the scope of the break is somewhat limited (it only applies to customers in a hybrid deployment), one could argue it’s an important focus area for Microsoft – especially given that it’s cloud-related. Microsoft has been trying really hard (with success, may I add) to promote Office 365 and get customers to onboard to “the service”. As such, I find it really surprising that it’s the n-th issue related to hybrid deployments in such a short time. In Cumulative Update 5, the Hybrid Configuration Wizard is broken and now there’s this.

Needless to say, you are warned about deploying Cumulative Updates into production. Pretty much every MVP which announced the Cumulative Update made the remark that you should better test the update before deploying it. I would say this is a general best-practice, but given the history of recent Exchange Server updates, I wouldn’t dare to deploy one without thoroughly testing it.

This brings me to another point: what happened to testing, Microsoft? I understand that it’s impossible to test every customer scenario that you can find out there, but how come that pretty obvious functionalities like these manage to slip through the cracks? If it were a one-time event, I could understand. But there’s a clear trend developing here.

Running a service like Office 365 is not easy. More so, the cadence at which the service evolves can be really scathing. On-premises customers have been struggling to keep up with the updates that are being released in the cloud, but it seems that Microsoft itself is having a hard time to keep up too.

On a final note, I’m wondering what customers with a hybrid deployment should do. According to Microsoft support guidelines, hybrid customers are requested to stay current with Exchange Server updates. But given that this is now two consecutive update that are causing problems, one might start to wonder if it’s not better to stay at CU4 as it was the last CU which did not have any hybrid issues…

I imagine that Microsoft is working hard on a fix for this issue, even during a holiday weekend… Let’s wait and see what happens early next week!

Until then, I would hold off on deploying CU6 and revert to using CU5 with the interim update which fixes the HCW bug or – if you don’t like IUs – stick to CU4/SP1.

Blog Exchange 2013 Hybrid Exchange News Office 365

Microsoft releases Exchange 2013 Cumulative Update 5 and Exchange 2010 Update Rollup 6

Today, Microsoft released Cumulative Update 5 for Exchange 2013 and Update Rollup 6 for Exchange 2010.

Exchange 2013 Cumulative Update 5

Next to a ton of bug fixes, Microsoft made changes to a few components including:

  • Offline Address Book generation
  • Hybrid Configuration Wizard

Except for the above changes, it looks like CU5 will mostly consist of fixes. By the looks of it and as Tony Redmond already pointed out CU5 promises to be a stable release. Whether it will stay that way is something only time will tell…

Installing Cumulative Update 5

Installing CU5 is no different from older versions. You can also immediately upgrade from any previous version of Exchange 2013 to CU5. There is no requirement to install SP1 (a.k.a. CU4) first.

After installation, Microsoft warns there might be a Managed Availability probe which went into overdrive and repeatedly restarts a newly added service called the Microsoft Exchange Shared Cache Service. However, this service isn’t used in CU5 (planned for the future?) and as such there is no impact at all.

However, if you are worried about your application log filling up with events from Managed Availability, you can disable the probe. More information can be found here.

This update also includes Active Directory changes, so you will be required to extend the AD schema. Given that you’re used to it by now, this shouldn’t present much of a problem. For more information on how to deploy a Cumulative Update, I suggest you have a look at the following article by ExchangeServerPro: 

Installing Cumulative Updates and Service Packs for Exchange Server 2013

You can download Cumulative Update 5 from here. The original release announcement is here.

Exchange 2010 Update Rollup 6

This update seems mainly to be a routine update to Exchange 2010. As expected, there are no major revelations except for a bunch of updates and fixes:

  • 2960652 Organizer name and meeting status field can be changed by EAS clients in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • 2957762 “A folder with same name already exists” error when you rename an Outlook folder in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • 2952799 Event ID 2084 occurs and Exchange server loses connection to the domain controllers in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • 2934091 Event ID 1000 and 7031 when users cannot connect to mailboxes in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • 2932402 Cannot move a mailbox after you install Exchange Server 2010 SP3 RU3 (KB2891587)
  • 2931842 EWS cannot identify the attachment in an Exchange Server 2010 environment
  • 2928703 Retention policy is applied unexpectedly to a folder when Outlook rule moves a copy in Exchange Server 2010
  • 2927265 Get-Message cmdlet does not respect the defined write scope in Exchange Server 2010
  • 2925273 Folder views are not updated when you arrange by categories in Outlook after you apply Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 3 Update Rollup 3 or Update Rollup 4
  • 2924592 Exchange RPC Client Access service freezes when you open an attached file in Outlook Online mode in Exchange Server 2010
  • 2923865 Cannot connect to Exchange Server 2010 when the RPC Client Access service crashes

You can download Rollop Update 6 from here.

Microsoft’s original release announcements can be found here.

Blog Exchange Exchange 2013 News

The UC Architects episode 37 now available!

Even though it’s only been a couple of days that we released episode 36 – “Live @ MEC”, we proudly announce the release of our latest episode: “episode 37 – don’t MEC my Heartbleed“.

In this latest installment, Steve, John, Michel, Stale and myself talk about a myriad of things including some random thoughts on the Microsoft Exchange Conference, the recently disclosed Heartbleed vulnerability and latest improvements in the world of Hybrid Exchange deployments. Stale also started a new feature called “using Lync like a Lync PRO” in which he will reveal a very handy tip on how to better use Lync. Make sure you don’t miss it!

Don’t let the length of the show (almost 2 hours!) scare you, it’s filled with tons of great info!

Talk to you soon!

Michael

Blog Events Exchange News Podcasts

Windows Server 2012 R2 ADFS ‘alternative login ID’, removes the need to have an internet-routable UPN

Recently, Microsoft released an update to Windows Server 2012 R2 which – next to a bunch of bug fixes – also includes new features to some of the Operating System’s components. Amongst these new features there’s one that I found particularly interesting, more specifically the update to the AD FS 3.0 component which enables customers to use a different attribute to identify federated uses in Windows Azure AD. The feature itself is better known as “Alternate Login ID”.

As the TechNet documentation on this topic describes, it would now be possible to use a different attributed from the User Principal Name to identify federated users in Office 365. This helps customers who aren’t able to change their UPNs from the current value (like e.g. domain.local or domain.corp) to an internet-routable domain (like domain.com). Even though that in many situations changing the UPN isn’t a big of a deal, some customers leverage the existing UPN in third party applications and therefore might not be able to make this change easily.

If you want to deploy this feature, you’ll have to figure some things out by yourself. The documentation that is currently available doesn’t explain all the steps. At least, that is if you want to implement it right away. I expect the documentation to become available shortly. Also mind that I haven’t seen any official statement that the use of “Alternate Login ID” is already supported by Office 365 today, but the documentation certainly hints to it and if I recall correctly, it was also announced at the Microsoft Exchange Conference, last week.

The configuration itself requires you to jump through a few hoops, including modifying DirSync to refer to the new attribute you’ve selected as being the Alternate Login ID instead of the UPN. Personally, I would still recommend changing the UPN – if possible. But there’s an alternative now and having alternative is always good thing, isn’t it?

I’ll definitely have a go at this later this week and will post my findings here.

-Michael

[Update 04/14/2014] Here’s the KB article describing the update I reference in this article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2927690

 

ADFS Blog Exchange Exchange 2013 Hybrid Exchange News Office 365

ITPROceed as alternative to the missing TechDays in Belgium this year?

Typically, this time of the year Microsoft would organize its TechDays: a multi-day technical conference with tracks for both IT Pro’s and developers. This year, however, there’s no TechDays. This leaves a gap in the Belgian “conference market”. To my knowledge, TechDays was attended by several hundred if not thousand attendees every year. Speakers from all over the place would come over and present on the latest and the greatest of Microsoft. But in general there would be a lot of local speakers involved too.

Recently the developers community announced their “Tech-o-rama” conference which would both serve as a replacement for the Community Days and somewhat fill the gap for TechDays. This is exactly what the IT PRO Community had in mind when launching the ITPROceed initiative.

ITPROCeed is a community-driven one-day conference, to be held in Antwerp on June 12th. Although not officially organized by Microsoft, the conference has certainly the potential to reach a wide audience as TechDays did. Here’s why:

Content

As mentioned earlier, there won’t be (many) other opportunities to learn from the experts first hand in Belgium, this year. As such, it seems like the perfect opportunity to catch up: for free.

The conference itself is divided into 4 tracks: SQL, System Center, Azure and Office Servers & Services. More than enough to create a balanced schedule with, don’t you think? It’s not only a good way to learn about new technology and features, it’s also great to interact with all of the experts who will be present that day.

Speakers

The speaker-lineup is phenomenal, in my opinion. A lot of Belgian MVPs will speaking at this event and many of them have spoken at various international conferences before. To give you just a few of these names: Mike Resseler, Alexandre Verkinderen, Johan Delimon, Dieter Vanhoye, Thomas Vochten, Ruben Nauwelaers, Pieter Vanhove, Nico Sienaert, Tim De Keukelaere, Donald Hessing and many, many more. Every single one of them are experts in their field.

So, if you haven’t subscribed yet, I strongly suggest you do so soon. It doesn’t happen every day that you get the ability to witness all this for free (in case you didn’t get it the first time). I for one, know what I will be doing that day…! http://www.itproceed.be/

See you there!

Michael

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