New hybrid Organization Config Transfer-feature (OCT) announced

Yesterday, Microsoft announced the Organization Config Transfer feature (OCT) in the Hybrid Configuration Wizard. The feature is expected to start showing up starting late June 2018. In an ongoing effort to improve the Wizard, I believe this is a step in the right direction. Ever since the HCW was first conceived, running the HCW resulted in a series of steps which you had to (manually) run through to ensure that the Exchange Online configuration matched the on-premises configuration.

For example, you had to recreate the retention policies and tags that existed in the on-premises organization if you wanted to continue to use them in Exchange Online (and not to lose them during a migration!). The same was true for other policies like the OWA Mailbox Policy or ActiveSync Policy.

With the OCT feature, the HCW will automatically take care of that and copy the settings of the following elements to Exchange online for you:

  • Retention Policy
  • Retention Policy Tags
  • OWA Mailbox Policy
  • Mobile Device Mailbox Policy
  • Active Sync Mailbox Policy

Note: in this version of the HCW, it will only copy “new” policies. These are policies that do not exist in Exchange Online. If a policy with the same name already exists in Exchange Online, or when you update the policy in the on-premises organization after it has been copied to Exchange Online, the OCT-feature will not “sync” the policy or updates thereof across. As per statement from Microsoft, this is something for the next version of the feature.

Some might say this is only a small addition to the HCW, and while it might not (yet) benefit existing Hybrid customers, it’s a welcome addition for any consultant working on getting customers across to Exchange Online as it makes life just a little easier!

I’m looking forward to what Microsoft has more for hybrid in the future. Remember BRK3155 at Ignite 2017? There was a ton of cool new stuff announced, but only little has been delivered so far… Let’s see what Microsoft might deliver for Ignite 2018 as, traditionally, there seems to be a sprint to get a lot of new features out of the door ahead of the annual conference of conferences.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

-Michael

Blog Office 365

How to leverage (multiple) migration endpoints to speed up migrations to Exchange Online

Last week, at Microsoft’s Tech Summit in Amsterdam, I gave a talk about running Exchange Hybrid connections over the long term. In that session, I talked about securing a hybrid deployment and – somewhat related – how to best and securely publish migration endpoints to the Internet.

Following that session, someone reached out to me asking me for more guidance on the topic. Except from what I have written about migration endpoints in the Office 365 for IT Pros e-book, I couldn’t find much else on the topic, so I figured I might elaborate on it a bit further. You can read more about it over on the blog of the ENow folks.

This being said, additional information beyond what’s described in this article can be found in the Office 365 for IT Pros e-book, which you can get here, if you’d like.

 

Blog Office 365

Help! Where do I put my Hybrid server?

As part of a hybrid Exchange server deployment, you also deploy the so-called Hybrid Server(s). The name itself might be a little misleading though. After all it’s not some sort of new Exchange server role, nor is it an Exchange server that you deploy specifically to be able to configure a hybrid environment – at least not if you’re already running Exchange 2010 or Exchange 2013 on-premises.

In fact, once you configure a hybrid environment, every Exchange Server in your environment becomes part of that hybrid deployment and will perform one, or more, functions in that regard. However, when referring to Hybrid Exchange servers, we actually mean the Exchange servers which are directly involved in hybrid functions. More specifically these will be the servers that you select during the Hybrid Configuration Wizard.

Exchange 2003 / 2007

If you have still Exchange 2003 on-premises (shame on you!), than your only option is to deploy at least one Exchange 2010 SP3 server and use that one to setup a hybrid deployment. The reason why you have to use an Exchange 2010 server is because Exchange 2013 cannot coexist with Exchange 2003.

Once you installed the Exchange 2010 server, it is the only server capable of understanding the hybrid logic; and therefore considered to be the Hybrid Server. There’s also another reason why a server would be referred to as your Hybrid Server, but more about that later when we’ll talk about the free Hybrid Server license key.

Hybrid Server License Key

Microsoft offers eligible customers free Hybrid Edition/Server licenses. Yes, indeed: multiple licenses if needed. In fact, you’ll get a single license key which you are allowed to deploy on multiple Exchange servers, for as long as you abide to the license requirements. This allows you to maintain high availability – also for hybrid functionality.

The license requirements tell you that you cannot use these ‘dedicated’ Hybrid Servers for anything else but that: you should not host any mailboxes on them. If you do, you are required to purchase a proper Exchange Server license. Once you assigned a Hybrid License to an Exchange server, that server also becomes a Hybrid Server in the pure sense of the word.

Hybrid Server Placement

When you are doing things by the book, introducing a new Exchange Server version could be a rather disruptive action. First, you have to prepare your environment for it (Active Directory schema updates etc) and then, once you have deployed the server, you are expected to point all client access traffic to it. This means that you will have to consider all the things involved with setting up coexistence. In smaller environments this might be a trivial task, but the larger the environment gets, the bigger the implications might be.

Although I prefer this approach (“by the book”), there are times where this isn’t appropriate. Even more, doing this might cause all sorts of issues which you might want to avoid – especially if you’re just looking for a quick way to move to the cloud. If so, the placement of the Hybrid Exchange can become a game changer.

One approach that I have used in the past is to install the new server into the Exchange organization and provide it with its own hybrid namespace. This hybrid namespace is nothing more than a dedicated namespace for hybrid functionality. By doing so, I prevent having to point client access traffic to the new servers and possibly disrupt my existing environment. I can then use the Hybrid Server(s) only     for mailbox moves, hybrid mail flow etc.

Multiple Internet-Connected sites

One of the tasks of hybrid servers is to facilitate mailbox moves to and from Exchange Online. The endpoint that you use for mailbox moves is normally discovered automatically using AutoDiscover. However, sometimes you might want to use Exchange Servers in a different location to perform the mailbox move. One of the reasons why you would want to do this is because that other server is maybe closer to the mailbox or it might have more bandwidth available.

When you want to use other internet-facing Exchange servers for mailbox moves, you must make sure that the MRS Proxy is enabled on those internet-facing servers. You can enable the MRS Proxy on each of these servers by executing the following command:

Set-WebServicesVirtualDirectory <identity> –MRSProxyEnabled:$true

Secondly, you could specify a new migration endpoint using PowerShell. This will allow you to pick your desired endpoint from the Mailbox Migration wizard as well (see image below). You can create new migration endpoints through PowerShell, using New-MigrationEdpoint cmdlet.

Once you have defined multiple migration endpoints, this is how it looks like in the GUI:

One thing to note here is that – regardless of the amount of migration endpoints you create – the sum of value of the “MaxConcurrentMigrations” attribute for all endpoints cannot exceed 100. The default endpoint (created automatically) will already have that set to 100. So make sure that you modify that first before creating additional endpoints.

The following image depicts the primary endpoint (outlook.domain.com) and the new secondary (and manually created) endpoint “migrationendpoint2.domain.com”:

Alternatively – if you don’t want to create additional endpoints or you plan on using that endpoint only once – you can create the move requests with PowerShell and specify the –RemoteHostname parameter manually.

Conclusion

Either approach outlined above should work just fine. Which one you choose greatly depends on your current deployment and the effort that goes with introducing a newer Exchange version into your environment. Whenever possible, try to take the by-the-book approach as it might save you some headaches further down the road.

Blog Exchange 2013 Hybrid Exchange Office 365

Why MEC is the place to be for Exchange admins/consultants/enthusiasts!

In less than a month, the 2014 edition of the Microsoft Exchange Conference will kick off in Austin, Texas. For those who haven’t decided if they will be going yet, here’s some reasons why you should.

The Value of Conferences

Being someone who frequently attends conferences, I *think* I’m in a position I can say that conferences provide great value. Typically, you can get up-to-date with the latest (and greatest) technology in IT.

Often, the cost for attending a conference are estimated higher than a traditional 5-day course. However, I find this not to be true – at least not all the time. It is true that – depending on where you fly in from – Travel & Expenses might add up to the cost. However, I think it is a good thing to be ‘away’ from your daily work environment. That typically leaves one less tempted to be pre-occupied with work rather than soaking in the knowledge shared throughout the conference. The experience is quite different from a training course. Conferences might not provide you the exact same information as in a training, but you’ll definitely be able to learn more (different) things. Especially if your skills in a particular product are already well-developed, conferences are the place to widen your knowledge.

On top of that, classroom trainings don’t offer you the same networking capabilities. In case of MEC, for instance, there will be a bunch of Exchange MVPs and Masters who you can talk to. All of them very knowledgeable and I’m sure they won’t mind a good discussion on Exchange! This could be your opportunity to ask some really difficult questions or just hear what their opinion is on a specific issue. Sometimes the insights of a 3rd person can make a difference…!

It is also the place where all the industry experts will meet. Like I mentioned earlier, there will be Masters and MVPs, but also a lot of people from within Microsoft’s Exchange Product Group will be there. What better people are there to ask your questions to?

Great Content

Without any doubt, the Exchange Conference will be the place in 2014 to learn about what’s happening with Exchange. Service Pack 1 – or Cumulative Update 4, if you will – has just been released and as you might’ve read there are many new things to discover.

At the same time, it’s been almost 1.5 years since Exchange 2013 has been released and there are quite some sessions that focus on deployment and migration. If you’re looking to migrate shortly, or if you’re a consultant migrating other companies, I’m sure you’ll get a lot of value from these sessions as they will be able to provide you with first-hand information. When MEC 2012 was held – shortly before the launch of Exchange 2013 – this wasn’t really possible as there weren’t many deployments out there.

Sure, one might argue that the install base for Exchange 2013 is still low. However, if you look back at it, deployments for Exchange 2010 only really kicked of once it was past the SP1 era. And I expect nothing else to happen for Exchange 2013.

As a reference: here’s a list of sessions I definitely look forward to:

And of course the “Experts unplugged” sessions:

I realize that’s way too many sessions already and I will probably have to make a choice which ones I will be able to attend…
But the fact that I have so many only proves that there’s so much valuable information at MEC…

Great speakers

I’ve had a look through who is speaking at MEC and I can only conclude that there is a TON of great speakers. All of which I am sure they will make it worth the wile. While Microsoft-speakers will most likely give you an overview of how things are supposed to work, many of the MVPs have sessions scheduled which might give you a slight less biased view of things. The combination of both makes for a good mix to get you started on the new stuff and broaden your knowledge of what was already there.

Location

Austin, Texas. I haven’t been there myself. But based on what Exchange Master Andrew Higginbotham blogged a few days ago; it looks promising!

Microsoft has big shoes to fill. MEC 2012 was a huge success and people are expecting the same – if not better – things from MEC 2014. Additionally, for those who were lucky enough to attend the Lync Conference in Vegas earlier this month, that is quite something MEC has to compete with. Knowing the community and the people behind MEC, I’m pretty confident this edition will be EPIC.

See you there!

Michael

Blog Exchange 2013 Microsoft Exchange Conference 2014 News Office 365 Uncategorized

Exchange Online Archiving (EOA): a view from the trenches – part 1

What is Exchange Online Archiving?

I’ve been meaning to write this article for quite a while now, so I’m glad it’s finally “ready”. First, let me start by introducing what Exchange Online Archiving (EOA in short) actually is.
This feature, first available since Exchange Hybrid, allows you to provision an cloud-based archive for an on-premises mailbox. While having an Exchange archive isn’t something new, at least not since Exchange 2010, the fact that the archive doesn’t have to be hosted within your own organization is pretty interesting.

Archives can be useful in many ways. One of the primary reasons why archives are used is to keep historical data for a longer period of time without cluttering a user’s primary mailbox. This could, for instance, be the case when you have to meet some compliance requirements which e.g. state that corporate data should be kept for 5 years. Although Exchange doesn’t have a problem with handling very large mailboxes including a high item count per folder, it’s usually the human component that cannot handle the overload of information that comes with having large amounts of data – at least that’s my experience. Keeping email inherently means that you’ll have to increase disk space to support the sometimes huge amounts of data that is involved. Although disk space has become quite cheap and Exchange 2013 is a great candidate to be used in combination with those cheap disks, there’s still a significant overhead involved in keeping that additional piece of infrastructure up and running.

This is where Exchange Online Archives could come in handy. First of all, there is no feature difference between an on-premises archive or a cloud-based (Office 365) archive. From a user’s point-of-view they both act and look the same. In fact, you are only offloading the task of storing archives to Office 365. The Exchange Online Plan 2 subscription automatically includes the right to provision unlimited-sized archives for your users. Although I don’t expect many people to run into the issue of filling up the initial 100GB, which you get provisioned to start with, any time soon, it’s very hard to match that offer for only  8$ per user per month… If you are only interested in EOA, there are specific EOA licenses as well which cost only a fraction of the full Exchange online license. Of course, this license will only allow you to use EOA and nothing more.

How does it work?

As briefly touched upon earlier, being able to use Exchange Online Archives is a by-product from having a hybrid Exchange deployment. A hybrid deployment, as the name stipulates, is the process of ‘pairing’ your On-Premises Exchange organization to Office 365; essentially creating one large “virtual Exchange organization”. As a result, having a (fully functional) Hybrid Deployment is the first requirement to abide to… Technically speaking it would be possible to setup a sort of minimalistic Hybrid deployment in which you leave out functionalities that you do not necessarily need to make Online Archives work (like e.g. cross-premises mail flow). Nonetheless I strongly encourage to still setup the full monty. It might save you some time afterwards if you decide to deploy cloud-based mailboxes anyway.

A very import part of the setup is set aside for DirSync. As you might remember, if you tick the “Hybrid Deployment” checkbox during DirSync setup, you allow it to write back some attributes into your on-premises organization. One of these attributes is the msExchArchiveStatus attribute. This attribute is a flag telling the on-premises organization whether an online archive has been provisioned or not. As we will see later in this section, this attribute is particularly important during the creation of an archive.

One of the questions I get asked regularly is whether you are required to deploy ADFS when setting up a hybrid deployment. The short answer is no. On the other hand, there are many good reasons why you would want to deploy ADFS, or rather: there are many good reasons why you would want to have some sort of single/same sign on. One reason I can think of it to simplify using online archives from an end user’s perspective. That way they won’t need to manage another set of credentials. Of course this isn’t only valid for online archives, it’s the same for each cloud-based workload in Office 365. ADFS can be one way of providing SSO, Password Sync is another. Both are valid options, neither are required and won’t be discussed here.

From a functional point-of-view, Online Archives have the exact same requirements as on-premises archives. You at least need Office 2007 SP3 Professional edition or later. Since we are running archives from Office 365, you also need to make sure to be up to speed with the latest required updates. For more information on what updates are needed, have a look at the following web page: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/office365-suite-help/software-requirements-for-office-365-for-business-HA102817357.aspx

Now that we got the prerequisites covered, let’s have a look at how the provisioning process works from a high-level perspective:

image

As you can derive from the image above, there are two DirSync operations needed. The first one is used to “tell” Office 365 to create an archive for user “X”. The second DirSync operation is used to sync back the msExchArchiveStatus attribute which will now have a value of 1 instead of 0. This is to tell the on-premises organization the archive has been created. A good way to verify whether this process has completed is to run the Get-Mailbox | fl *arch* command:

image

Here you can see that the archive was created successfully (ArchiveStatus = Active). However, we are missing a part of the information. This is because the on-premises organization cannot provide the information from Office 365 (which is essentially another Exchange organization). To fetch the missing information, you’ll have to open up a remote PowerShell session to Exchange Online and run the Get-MailUser | fl *arch* command:

image

Conclusion

This is it for part one of this article.
In the following part, I will talk about some of the gotchas, do’s and don’ts. Stay tuned!

Exchange Exchange 2013 Hybrid Exchange Office 365

Update: Disappearing (online) archives after moving your mailbox to Office 365

Update

After a few weeks of mailing back and forth with Microsoft’s support, I was today (finally) able to confirm that the issue which I described below is now solved.

It seems that Microsoft rolled out a hotfix/code change for their Exchange Online service. Although, at first, I thought the issue was related to a bug in EMC for not correctly issuing all parameters when initiating a remote mailbox move, it seems the issue had more to it than that. Basically, what happened is that when MRS moved the mailbox from on-premises environment to Office 365, it wouldn’t keep the link to the already-existing archive. This caused a new (empty) archive to be created and could possibly cause data loss.

I’m happy to see what time and effort Microsoft has put into solving this issue. It proves that Microsoft is concerned about the quality of their product / service. In fact, it would surprise me if they weren’t. A bug that could cause data-loss is not really something you’d want to carry around for a long time!

Thanks to everyone involved and kudo’s to Philippe Phan Cao Bach (Sr. Escalation Engineer) who was working with me on this case.

Original Post

Office 365 offers great ways to enhance the functionalities of your on-premises deployment. By running the Hybrid Configuration Wizard (which Steve Goodman explains in this article) you can configure both environments to act as one; allowing you to make use of features such as e.g. Online Archives (EOA).

With Exchange Online Archives, your primary mailbox stays in your on-premises Exchange server, whereas the archive will – as the name might have given away – be hosted in Office 365. If you’re interested in finding out more about Online Archives, I suggest that you take a look at Bharat Suneja’s session at TechEd this year: “Archiving in the cloud with Exchange Online Archiving

The problem

To me, one of the most interesting things about a hybrid deployment is the flexibility it offers. You can put a few mailboxes in Office 365, try them out and move more to the service if you like it.

If you are looking to take that approach, this information might be interesting for you!

Imagine the following: you are trying out Office 365 and decide to use Online Archives to start with. You provision the archives and life is great! After a while you decide you want to use more and you decide to move some mailboxes to Office 365. However, after your users have been moved to Office 365 they start complaining that their archive is empty.

It seems that – although this scenario is supported – there are some issues with the provisioning process when you move a user to Office 365 that previously already had an Online Archive: it get’s “wiped”. At least, that’s how it looks like.

At first, I though the data would reappear after a while, so I made sure that I waited long enough. Unfortunately even after a few days, the archives was still empty.

I decided to do some tests, to make sure this wasn’t a standalone case. Perhaps something went wrong during the move. To my surprise, tests confirmed what was going on: although the archive contained items prior to the move, they are now empty.

To explain what happens, let me describe the process I used to reproduce this issue.

This first screenshot show the details of the on-premises mailbox that has a cloud-based archive (EOA) enabled. This archive contains 4 (test) items:

image

Afterwards, I moved the mailbox through the Exchange Management Console using the “New Remote Move Request”-wizard.

Because on-premises only a mailbox exists, you don’t have the option to move an archive (which is normal):
image

The move completed successfully, and after having waited long enough (DirSync etc.). I verified the mailbox’s settings:

image

The interesting part here is that the Archive, although having the same GUID, appears to have been moved to the same database as the mailbox. Before the archive resided in database “EURPRD04DG032-db055” whereas now it’s in “EURPRD04DG030-db041”.

To ascertain myself that this wasn’t causing problems, I decided to do another test. When executing the MoveRequest, I specified to what database the archive should be moved to. I made sure that the target database of the Online Archive was set to the database it was already residing in before moving the mailbox:

New-MoveRequest “Testmivh5” –RemoteHostName “hostname.company.com” –targetdeliverydomain “tenant.mail.onmicrosoft.com” –ArchiveTargetDatabase “EURPRD04DC032-db055” –RemoteCredential (Get-Credential)

Note   this cmdlet was executed from PowerShell connected to Exchange Online.

After the move completed (successfully btw), I – again – waited long enough for DirSync/replication/provisioning to occur. I deliberately didn’t force DirSync to ensure that wasn’t causing any issues either. But alas, none of that helped: the archive was again empty.

A quick look at the object’s attributes revealed that – although a target database parameter was provided – the archive still got moved to the same database as the user:

image

Then, I was thinking that the ‘old’ archive perhaps got disabled and that a new one was created. Although this would be strange since the GUID of the archive remains the same, I thought it was worth a try. Again: no joy! No disconnected mailboxes were to be found.

After all this testing, I had reasons enough to call Microsoft Support. After a few calls back and forth, they recently came back to me confirming that this is a known issue and that they’re currently working on it.

Until today I’m still not sure what the cause of the problem is. I haven’t received any feedback yet either. Of course, I will keep you posted as soon as I find out more!

Temporary workaround

It might sound too obvious, but the workaround is simple: either create both archive and mailbox in the cloud or create the (both!) on-premises first and move them together to the cloud. Both cases work just fine!

Conclusion

Although the last thing you’d want to experience is data-loss, I’m well aware that only a few customers, world-wide, would try this scenario. Nevertheless, it’s an issue that should be addressed quickly.

In our case, we have lost only a single archive worth a few hundred megabytes of emails. I can imagine that losing the wrong kind of emails might be a real big issues for some companies. I haven’t asked, but I’m pretty confident that – even though the emails seem lost – Microsoft can somehow recover the data so that you don’t really “lose” anything. I honestly cannot imagine otherwise.

Does this mean that I discourage using features like EOA? Absolutely not. I still have my hosted archive and I am pretty happy with it. Apart from some inconveniences which I will write about another time, it provides me with everything I need. Furthermore, it allows us to give everyone a relatively large archive without having to bear the costs of additional storage.

Until later!

Blog Exchange Hybrid Exchange Office 365

Disappearing (online) archives after moving your mailbox to Office 365…

Office 365 offers great ways to enhance the functionalities of your on-premises deployment. By running the Hybrid Configuration Wizard (which Steve Goodman explains in this article) you can configure both environments to act as one; allowing you to make use of features such as e.g. Online Archives (EOA).

With Exchange Online Archives, your primary mailbox stays in your on-premises Exchange server, whereas the archive will – as the name might have given away – be hosted in Office 365. If you’re interested in finding out more about Online Archives, I suggest that you take a look at Bharat Suneja’s session at TechEd this year: “Archiving in the cloud with Exchange Online Archiving

The problem

To me, one of the most interesting things about a hybrid deployment is the flexibility it offers. You can put a few mailboxes in Office 365, try them out and move more to the service if you like it.

If you are looking to take that approach, this information might be interesting for you!

Imagine the following: you are trying out Office 365 and decide to use Online Archives to start with. You provision the archives and life is great! After a while you decide you want to use more and you decide to move some mailboxes to Office 365. However, after your users have been moved to Office 365 they start complaining that their archive is empty.

It seems that – although this scenario is supported – there are some issues with the provisioning process when you move a user to Office 365 that previously already had an Online Archive: it get’s “wiped”. At least, that’s how it looks like.

At first, I though the data would reappear after a while, so I made sure that I waited long enough. Unfortunately even after a few days, the archives was still empty.

I decided to do some tests, to make sure this wasn’t a standalone case. Perhaps something went wrong during the move. To my surprise, tests confirmed what was going on: although the archive contained items prior to the move, they are now empty.

To explain what happens, let me describe the process I used to reproduce this issue.

This first screenshot show the details of the on-premises mailbox that has a cloud-based archive (EOA) enabled. This archive contains 4 (test) items:

image

Afterwards, I moved the mailbox through the Exchange Management Console using the “New Remote Move Request”-wizard.

Because on-premises only a mailbox exists, you don’t have the option to move an archive (which is normal):
image

The move completed successfully, and after having waited long enough (DirSync etc.). I verified the mailbox’s settings:

image

The interesting part here is that the Archive, although having the same GUID, appears to have been moved to the same database as the mailbox. Before the archive resided in database “EURPRD04DG032-db055” whereas now it’s in “EURPRD04DG030-db041”.

To ascertain myself that this wasn’t causing problems, I decided to do another test. When executing the MoveRequest, I specified to what database the archive should be moved to. I made sure that the target database of the Online Archive was set to the database it was already residing in before moving the mailbox:

New-MoveRequest “Testmivh5” –RemoteHostName “hostname.company.com” –targetdeliverydomain “tenant.mail.onmicrosoft.com” –&lt;strong&gt;ArchiveTargetDatabase &lt;/strong&gt;“EURPRD04DC032-db055” –RemoteCredential Get-Credential)

Note   this cmdlet was executed from a remote PowerShell connection to Exchange Online.

After the move completed (successfully btw), I – again – waited long enough for DirSync/replication/provisioning to occur. I deliberately didn’t force DirSync to ensure that wasn’t causing any issues either. But alas, none of that helped: the archive was again empty.

A quick look at the object’s attributes revealed that – although a target database parameter was provided – the archive still got moved to the same database as the user:

image

Then, I was thinking that the ‘old’ archive perhaps got disabled and that a new one was created. Although this would be strange since the GUID of the archive remains the same, I thought it was worth a try. Again: no joy! No disconnected mailboxes were to be found.

After all this testing, I had reasons enough to call Microsoft Support. After a few calls back and forth, they recently came back to me confirming that this is a known issue and that they’re currently working on it.

Until today I’m still not sure what the cause of the problem is. I haven’t received any feedback yet either. Of course, I will keep you posted as soon as I find out more!

Temporary workaround

It might sound too obvious, but the workaround is simple: either create both archive and mailbox in the cloud or create the (both!) on-premises first and move them together to the cloud. Both cases work just fine!

Conclusion

Although the last thing you’d want to experience is data-loss, I’m well aware that only a few customers, world-wide, would try this scenario. Nevertheless, it’s an issue that should be addressed quickly.

In our case, we have lost only a single archive worth a few hundred megabytes of emails. I can imagine that losing the wrong kind of emails might be a real big issues for some companies. I haven’t asked, but I’m pretty confident that – even though the emails seem lost – Microsoft can somehow recover the data so that you don’t really “lose” anything. I honestly cannot imagine otherwise.

Does this mean that I discourage using features like EOA? Absolutely not. I still have my hosted archive and I am pretty happy with it. Apart from some inconveniences which I will write about another time, it provides me with everything I need. Furthermore, it allows us to give everyone a relatively large archive without having to bear the costs of additional storage.

Until later!

Blog Exchange Hybrid Exchange Office 365